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Operating Environments with similar Performance Needs

Performance needs in Air Traffic Management refer to the performance required in a specific part of the network (Operating Environment) at a specific point in time.

Data Relationships

This Performance Needs view was developed in support of the European ATM Master Plan Level 2.

The various Airports and ATS Units, categorised in Operating Environments, are classified based primarily on traffic and complexity.  These Operating Environment classifications derived from potential Performance Needs do not imply resulting implementation obligations.

The Airports considered covers traffic at European airports representing 70% of all European flights in 2012, either departed from or arrived at one of these airports.

These Airports are classified according to their utilisation and surface layout complexity as follows:

  • LUSL Airport: Low Utilisation (<90% utilisation during 1 or 2 peak periods a day), Simple Layout.
  • LUCL Airport: Low Utilisation (<90% utilisation during 1 or 2 peak periods a day), Complex Layout
  • HUSL Airport: High Utilisation airports (>90% utilisation during 3 or more peak periods a day), Simple Layout
  • HUCL Airport: High Utilisation airports (>90% utilisation during 3 or more peak periods a day), Complex Layout

The allocation of “approach” functions to ACCs, dedicated TMA Units or Airport Towers is an operational and business decision for the relevant Service Providers. Additionally, European States have adopted different philosophies as to how they formally define “TMA Airspace”.

The Performance Needs classifications for “TMA and Approach” are therefore based on the needs of the airspace and make no assumption about which operational ATS Unit provides the service. (As a matter of fact, in some cases responsibility changes between Units according to the time of day.)

If you believe there are missing or wrong classifications for certain of your State’s Operating Environments, please provide feedback here (hyperlinking the Portal Feedback form)

The TMAs listed are classified according to their complexity using as an indicator their 2012 traffic capability as follows:

  • Low-Complexity TMAs handle less than 30 movements in peak hour;
  • Medium-Complexity TMAs handle between 30 and 60 movements in peak hour;
  • High-Complexity TMAs handle more than 60 movements in peak hour.

For En‑route Operating Environments, the categories are based on the Complexity score, which is a composite measure combining traffic density (concentration of traffic in space and time) with structural complexity (structure of traffic flows) as described in the PRR Report 2013

  • Low-Complexity En‑route have a traffic complexity score 2013 below 2;
  • Medium-Complexity En‑route have a traffic complexity score 2013 between 2 and 6;
  • High-Complexity En‑route have a traffic complexity score 2013 above 6.

The Network is considered as a continuum so there is no Complexity sub-categorisation.